Agile 20xx – It Takes a Team

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Inspired by this post I just read from Seth Godin. As an average joe, hob-nobbing with CEOs isn’t so likely for most of us but the interpersonal interaction certainly is worth making time for. However…

If you’re paying to learn and thinking of attending Agile 2011 (or any other really big conference) take a team!

For the last couple of years I’ve attended the big US Agile Alliance conferences. I love going although I miss my family; I really enjoy the social interaction, spending time with (on the surface) a bunch of smart, similar-minded people sharing a week of learning, collaboration and fun. There are of course undercurrents (see this old post from Jean Tabaka) but I still find attending these conferences a rewarding experience.

For anyone that’s not been, the Agile 20xx conferences are huge and seem to be getting bigger every year. The number of parallel tracks – all with great presenters means you really have to make a plan.

Each year I’ve attended, I’ve had the luxury of going out as part of a team. My advice to future attendees is the same – take a team and collaborate on what you want to see.

My goal each year is to walk away with at least 3 key pieces of new thinking that would add value to my teams. The travel and conference fee for just 3 ideas might be excessive but as I said, I also go to learn, collaborate and have fun.

If even 1 of the ideas I bring back is sticky enough to be introduced successfully to a group of nearly a thousand engineers worldwide then I think that’s worthwhile!

So which sessions do you attend?

Personally I tend to steer away from the “rock star” sessions. Most of what they’re presenting is covered in their current or forthcoming books (and I read a lot of those already) so I don’t get much from them. Other members of my team don’t read so much and so will go along to some of these. Get the team to strike a balance but make sure the motivation is to learn and share, not just to meet “famous people“.

The stuff out there from people without book deals is rarer so I make the most of those sessions but less-experienced or well-known presenters may mean a higher risk of a not-so-good session.  Also keep an eye out for the open space sessions and lightning talks. You’ll find a lot of up-and-coming talent and thinking out there but again, your mileage may vary.

I also tend to look for things that are relevant to my current context, and future direction, not just my current role. A big part of my interest is in viewing things from other people’s and roles perspectives - for example I’ve never formally had the job title of “tester” but “Agile Testing” is one of the best books I’ve read that really “gets” cross-role pairing and test strategies – relevant to developers and managers, not just testers!

Others may prefer to spend the entire week in “UX” or “Testing” tracks but generally I strongly discourage spending the entire week in a single track in your own domain - you just don’t learn enough of the other interesting gems. Maybe it’s just me but agile isn’t just about your own specialist area, it’s about the whole team and organization.

Having presented at Agile Cambridge last year; I and my team have submitted a couple of proposals for Agile 2011 as we’re hoping we can start to give something back. There’s a lot of presentations out there so our chances are slim however despite the number that don’t make it, there are hundreds of great ones that do.

When planning your sessions, take a team and go for a knowledge portfolio – balance risk & reward to get maximum return on your investment. You won’t regret it.

 

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