Escaping the Oubliette (Part 4) – The Litter Patrol

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As promised in my last installment on oubliettes…

Your team might not be fully ready for the merciless refactoring encouraged by some agile approaches but this will help you stay heading in the right direction whilst keeping the delivery vs refactoring impacts balanced out.

The cost of change has a (roughly) logarithmic relationship to debt. I’ve seen first-hand how high-debt systems become almost impossible to change and it’s not pretty.

In a debt-ridden system we are eventually faced with a choice; refactor or replace. Eventually even once-newly-replaced systems build up debt and the refactor/replace choice returns. Craig Larman & Bas Vodde’s most recent book covers the debt/cost relationship brilliantly in the section on “legacy code”. They also describe the oubliette strategy of “Do No Harm” or as I call it – The Litter Patrol“.

This is a particularly powerful debt management approach as it’s both a prevention and reduction strategy.

Here’s the basic concept…

When working with an area of legacy code, you’re working in a particular “neighbourhood“. If that neighbourhood is untidy your care and attention to that neighbourhood is diminished. Much like the “broken windows” principle; once the damage seal is broken, neglect and further damage follow and overall code quality deteriorates rapidly.

So (without going overboard), every time you’re working in a particular neighbourhood, what can you do to clean up a few pieces of litter?

Not the run-down shopping district between lines 904 and 2897 but more the abandoned classic car between lines 857 and 892 or the overflowing trashcan on the corner between 780 and 804.

If you introduce a litter patrol in your teams and encourage a hygiene cycle with every change to your code, your debt load and future cost of change will rapidly reduce for the areas you hit most frequently.

Unfortunately although this is easier than a complete refactoring of a poorly designed class-hierarchy or monolithic god-class, in order to perform the litter patrol in safety on your code you need good unit tests or small functional tests for that neighbourhood and ideally some refactoring support (I like to call these your gloves, garbage bag and litter picker).

This challenge doesn’t mean don’t do it. In fact if you don’t have tests already, maybe your next patrol isn’t changing the code at all but to write just a couple of small, independent tests to demonstrate how that area is expected to behave. (You might even need to make some tweaks to make it testable)

If it’s hard, don’t avoid the problem, focus on making life easier one bite or constraint at a time.

Every time we successfully deliver a small clean-up task, the future cost of change to that area is reduced and our incentive to keep it clean is improved.

Look out for part 5 – sponsorship – coming soon.

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